Stay the Course of the Paris Agreement on Climate Change

Religious believers are strongly committed to act to address the challenge of climate change. This commitment to act–shared across religions–is based upon a deep understanding of its scientific and–above all–moral and religious dimensions. As a result, many religious communities strongly supported the Paris Agreement that deals with greenhouse gas emissions mitigation, adaptation, and finance, signed in December 2015 by 195 countries.

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Submission: Freedom of Religion Inquiry

The Islamic Council of Victoria’s senior policy advisor has prepared a submission to the Joint Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs, Defense and Trade, Inquiry into the Status of the human right to freedom of Religion or belief. The submission powerfully argues for the protection the human right of freedom of religion for Muslim-Victorians while highlighting cases and effects of breaches of this human right.

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Faith Over Fear


Today Religions for Peace, UNICEF and a global coalition of religious leaders are launching #FaithOverFear. Faith Over Fear is a global campaign to inspire people of all faiths to welcome and help refugees. The campaign will share a series of stories about families of faith from around the world who have opened their hearts, homes, and communities to refugees. By lifting up these heartwarming examples, Religions for Peace hopes to contribute to a more welcoming environment for refugees around the globe.

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The “Buddhist pop song” that took sixth at Eurovision


On Saturday, an Italian song about the emptiness of Western consumer culture came sixth at Europe’s wildly popular song competition, Eurovision. Occidentali’s Karma, by Francesco Gabbani, was Italy’s entry to the contest, and while the song (which is flush with Buddhist references) didn’t win, it was a hit with critics. The song was the most watched music video of the contest and was chosen as a favourite by fans and the press.

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The Vatican, Black Holes, and the Big Bang

What happens if you fall into a Black Hole? What happened in the early Big Bang? What is the ultimate destiny of the cosmos? These and other questions will be at the center of discussions at a scientific workshop on “Black Holes, Gravitational Waves and Space-Time Singularities” which will be held from May 9-12 at the Vatican Observatory in Castel Gandolfo. Among the 35 invited participants, are renowned scientists such as the 1999 Nobel Laureate in Physics, Gerald ‘t Hooft; 1988 Wolf Prize co-winner Roger Penrose; and cosmologists George Ellis, Renata Kallosh and Andrei Linde and Joe Silk.

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